Publications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volume 2:
A Golden Age in American Printmaking: 1929-1934

Belverd E. Needles, Jr.
Essay by Elizabeth G. Seaton

A Golden Age in American Printmaking: 1929-1934 focuses on an era in which American artists created and innovated in printmaking to an extent rarely witnessed.  All of this accomplished in spite of the hardship faced by these artists in the early years of the depression, before government subsidies of art began in 1935.  This volume explores the range and the complexity of the period, and illustrates how political, social, and economic factors influenced the production of printmaking during this convoluted era.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volume 3:
A Democratic Age in American Printmaking: Realism and Regionalism, 1935-1944

Belverd E. Needles, Jr.
Essay by Belverd E. Needles, Jr. and Rachel Stephens

A Democratic Age in American Printmaking: Realism and Regionalism, 1935-1944 is the first of two dealing with American printmaking in 1935-1944 and focuses on an era in which American artists created “art for the people.”  The leaders of this movement – Thomas Hart Benton, John Steuart Curry, and Grant Wood – left the urban environment rejecting European modernist art to discover an “American” art in straightforward, often symbolic, representations of the world around them.  It was an age in which lithography was paramount because of its close relationship to drawing and its ability to produce large editions at low prices for the public.  This volume explores not only the “Big Three” but also more than sixty-five other artists from all parts of the country who participated in this movement.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volume 5:
A Passion for Color: American Women Printmakers, 1895-1965

Belverd E. Needles, Jr.
Essay by Belverd E. Needles, Jr. and Christopher Mack and Jennifer Walker

A Passion for Color: American Women Printmakers, 1895-1965 presents an in-depth survey of color prints by American Women artists from the breakthrough intaglio prints of Mary Cassatt in the 1890s to the exceptional color lithography of June Wayne at the beginning of the printmaking workshop era at Tamarind Institute in the 1960s.  Women artists were important contributors to all movements in color printmaking in the first half of the twentieth century including Japonisme, Provincetown, California, social realism, Atelier 17, and abstract expressionism.  They made significant innovations in all techniques of color printmaking: intaglio, woodblock, lithography, and screenprinting. This volume presents approximately 110 images by more than sixty artists including Mary Cassatt, June Wayne, Helen Hyde, Bertha Lum, Bertha Jacques, Marguerite Zorach, Eliza Draper Gardiner, Francis H. Gearhart, Margaret Jordan Paterson, Blanche Lazzell, Margaret Lowengrund, Waunita Smith, Bernarda Bryson, Elizabeth Olds, Riva Helfond, Mildred Rackley, Augusta Rathbone, Deborah Remington, Vera Berdich, Dorr Bothwell, Ynez Johnston, Margaret Burroughs, Elizabeth Catlett, Sylvia Wald, Minna Citron, Sue Fuller, Worden Day, and Ann Ryan.

 

Coming Soon: Ink, Paper, Politics from the DePaul Art Museum, featuring the Collection of Belverd and Marian Needles

Ink, Paper, Politics is a beautifully produced catalog that accompanies an exhibition at the DePaul Art Museum in celebration of the generous gift to the museum of one hundred WPA-era prints from the collection of Belverd and Marian Needles. In addition to full-color reproductions of the prints in the exhibition, the book also features essays by leading scholars addressing various aspects of American printmaking in the 1930s, as well as a brief essay by the collector. The result is a wonderful reminder of the stunning artwork that was produced in our name at one of our nation’s darkest times.


Forthcoming Publications:

Volume 1: The Emergent Age of American Printmaking: 1890-1928

Volume 4: A Democratic Age in American Printmaking: The WPA and Social Realism, 1935-1943

Volume 6: The Post World War II Age of American Printmaking: 1945-1960

 


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